Adobe Premiere and the GTX-1080 Video Card

This past weekend (June 11 and 12, 2016) I had a chance to test out the new GTX-1080 video card from MSI with Adobe Premiere CC 2015.

I have been reading rave reviews from the gamer communities about this video card and how much of a performance increase people were see with this card. So, I decided to test it out with Adobe Premiere CC 2015.

(Later this summer I will be doing new benchmark testing and updating our Adobe Premiere Benchmark article found here: https://www.studio1productions.com/Articles/Premiere-Benchmark.htm)

The computer I used was a Intel I7-5930K with 16 GB of memory and 3 Western Digital 1 TB Black hard drives.

I ran a couple of quick tests against the GTX-980 and a Titan X video card. I used both a benchmark project and a real world project.  I also did a few tests with a 4K project.

The difference between the benchmark project and a real world project is, the benchmark project is made up of almost all GPU effects/transitions. This is designed to push the GPU for benchmarking purposes and it may not represent a typical timeline for most people.

The real world project, the timeline contains simple cuts and a lot fewer GPU effects/transitions. In this case the CPU is doing most of the work. This might be more of a realistic time line for some people.

Here are the results for rendering the timeline using the Benchmark Project:
GTX-980 took 20 seconds
Titan X took 14 seconds
GTX-1080 took 14 seconds

As you can see above, the GPU is doing most of the work due to timeline being made up of GPU effects/transitions.

Here are the results for rending the timeline using a real world project:
GTX-980 took 127 seconds
Titan X took 127 seconds
GTX-1080 took 127 seconds

With above, since the timeline wasn’t loaded with GPU effects/transitions, the CPU was doing most of the work.

Why are the results the same for all three video card with the real world project? It’s simple, there wasn’t enough GPU effects/transitions on this timeline to get any improvement between the three video cards. The GPU usage never went over 50% with any of these video cards.

Next I ran a text using a 4K project, here are the results:
GTX-980 took 62 seconds
Titan X took 55 seconds
GTX-1080 took 51 seconds

If you are editing with Adobe Premiere and you are already using a high end video card, then you may not need to upgrade to the GTX-1080 as the increase in performance isn’t that much.

Since not all timelines are going to be made up of the same GPU effects/transitions, the results you get are going to vary. For example, if you have a 15 minute timeline and it is all cuts only and you are not using any GPU effects, then the video card will not be used when rendering the timeline.

However, take that same timeline and instead of using all straight cuts, you use a dissolve, the GPU will come into play as the dissolve is a GPU transition.

NOTE: Currently there is bug in the nVidia drivers version 368.25, which is for the GTX-1080 and GTX-1070, where you can’t preview R3D media. All you get is a black video. Hopefully, nVidia will get this fixed soon.

NOTE: Your results will vary depending on your computer and how many GPU effects/transitions you have on your timeline.

Bottom line, I would say the GTX-1080 is 5% faster than the Titan X at a much lower cost than the Titan X. I was hoping for a better performance results like the gamers are seeing, but running it in Adobe Premiere it is just not there for me.