Labeling a Film Clapboard or Film Slate

We have written an article on How to Use a Film Clapboard.  Also known as a Clapperboard or Clapboard Slate.

In this article we explain how to use the Film Clapboard and what you should be writing on it to make the post production process easier.

One of the questions I am asked the most is, “I want to label the Film Clapboard with some type of lettering, what should I use?”

What we have used with success is with removable vinyl letters and numbers from Chartpak and are called  Pickett Design Vinyl Numbers/Letters Stickers, 3/4″, Black.  You can get them in other sized, but the 3/4 inch ones fit the best.

You can find them online at places like Amazon.com or at most office supply websites or store.  These letters are great for labeling the name of the Production, the Directory, the Camera operator and the Date.

For the Roll (also known as Tape or Media), Scene and the Take, you should use a vis-à-vis Wet Erase Pen, instead of a dry erase pen.  Even though the white Film Clapboards say you can use a Dry Erase pen, we have found that some brands will stain the Clapperboard.  This is why I prefer to use the Wet Erase Pens that we sell on the page with all of our Film Clapboard Slates.

If you are using the Clapboard as a decoration for the wall, which a lot of filmmakers and Videographers do.  Then in addition to using the ¾ inch letters, also pickup some 2 inch letters and number to use in the Roll, Scene, Take areas.

Here is the article on How to Use a Film Clapboard.

Testing the GTX 750 Ti with Adobe Premiere

I have been testing the GTX 750 Ti video card with Adobe Premiere CC these last few weeks and this is how it compares to the GTX 650 Ti

1. Power Supply – The GTX 750 Ti only needs a 300 watt power supply, where the GTX 650 Ti needs a 400  watt power supply.  So if you have an off the shelf computer such as HP or Dell, and the computer has a smaller power supply, which they usually do, you will be able to use this video card in those systems.  Just make sure they have at least a 300 watt power supply.

2. Performance – The GTX 750 Ti and the GTX 650 Ti (not the boost version) performed almost identical.

Rendering the Premiere Timeline with our test files, the GTX 750 Ti took an average of 7.5 seconds and the GTX 650 Ti  took and average of 8 seconds.  Both tests I had the Premiere using the GPU.

Exporting to MPEG-2, the GTX 750 Ti took an average of 153 seconds and the GTX 650 Ti took an average of 156 seconds.  Again, in these tests I had Premiere set to use the GPU.

As you can see there is not much of a difference between the two card performance wise.  The big thing with the GTX 750 Ti, is it allows users that have a small power supply improve their editing performance without having to upgrade the power supply.

Bottom Line – If you have a GTX 650 Ti, there is really no reason to upgrade the video card to a GTX 750 Ti.  If you are running an older video card, such as a GT 240, GT 440 or a GT 640, and you want better performance, then by all means upgrade to the GTX 750 Ti.

What about the GTX 750?  Well there is only $20 difference between the GTX 750 and the GTX 750 Ti, so I only tested the GTX 750 Ti since it had more CUDA cores and the other specs were similar.  Send the extra $20 and go for the GTX 750 Ti over the GTX 750.

 

DSLR Camera Cage

Our new DSLR Camera Cage is designed to work most of the DSLR cameras on the market today. The DSLR camera cage protects you camera while shooting video or stills. Plus, it allows you mount microphones, LED video lights, LCD monitors, friction arms, sound recorders and other accessories to the DLSR Cage.

The DSLR Cage comes with a top handle and industry standard 15mm rails for mounting a matte box and/or follow focus controls.

The entire DSLR camera cage is made of aluminum and is hard anodized for durability. There is a total of 48 – 1/4-20 threaded mounting holes all over the DSLR Cage so you can mount what ever equipment you need to the DSLR Camera Cage.

On the bottom of the DSLR cage, is an opening for battery access on most DSLR cameras.

While other DSLR Camera Cages are designed to fit just one or two models of DSLR cameras, our DSLR Cage is designed to work with most DSLR cameras. This way, you don’t need to buy a new DSLR Cage if you should upgrade your DSLR camera.

The DSLR Cage has both 1/4-20 and 3/8-16 tripod mounting holes on the bottom so you can mount it on a tripod or a quick release plate.

When you purchase the DSLR Cage, you will receive a cage that is fully assembled. All you need to do is slide the rods into the bottom and tighten the thumb screws. Then simply attach the handle to the top with the two screws and Allen Wrench that we provide.

Please Note: Other companies do not assemble the DSLR cage before the ship it to you, so when you get theirs and you open up the box, you will find yourself with a box of parts and screws. We don’t think that is right, so this is why we assemble the cage ourselves.

https://www.studio1productions.com/dslr-cage.htm