UPDATE: Problems with Video Cards and Adobe Premiere CC 2015.3

This mainly applies to those of you who are running on a Windows PC. However I do have some limited information for MAC users at the end of this post.

Adobe updated Premiere CC to version 2015.3 and with this new version, they dropped support for older “legacy” video cards. These cards include:

GTX-200 series and mobile versions
GTX-300 series and mobile versions
GTX-400 series and mobile versions
GTX-500 series and mobile versions
GTX-600 series and mobile versions

Quadro FX series and mobile versions
Quadro CX, 200, 2000, 4000, 5000 and 6000 and mobile versions

Even though some video cards are still on Adobe’s “approved” list of video cards, they are no longer working correctly when having CUDA enabled in the Mercury Playback Engine with Premiere CC 2015.3.  So disregard what Adobe has listed on their website as to what video cards will work with Premiere as it is out of date with the Premiere 2015.3 release.

Initially, Adobe was telling users to roll the video card driver back to an earlier version.  However, that doesn’t make any difference for the vast majority of users who are experiencing problems getting their “legacy” video cards to run with CUDA enabled.

Adobe now consider these to be “legacy” video cards and you should not look for Adobe to provide support for these video cards.

If you have one of these video cards, Adobe is now telling people they need to upgrade the video card or to roll back to version CC 2015.2 of Premiere.

The cards that are being reported as working fine with Adobe Premiere CC 2015.3 are:

GTX-700 series and mobile versions
GTX-900 series and mobile versions
GTX-1000 series and mobile versions (GTX-1080, GTX-1070, etc.)
Quadro M series and mobile versions
Quadro K series and mobile versions

MAC Users:
Some people are reporting problems using CUDA with a legacy video card. Right now, the fix is to remove CUDA and run the video with OpenCL. While it may be slower, it is not as slow as running with no GPU acceleration at all.

David Knarr
https://www.studio1productions.com

Adobe Premiere and the GTX-1080 Video Card

This past weekend (June 11 and 12, 2016) I had a chance to test out the new GTX-1080 video card from MSI with Adobe Premiere CC 2015.

I have been reading rave reviews from the gamer communities about this video card and how much of a performance increase people were see with this card. So, I decided to test it out with Adobe Premiere CC 2015.

(Later this summer I will be doing new benchmark testing and updating our Adobe Premiere Benchmark article found here: https://www.studio1productions.com/Articles/Premiere-Benchmark.htm)

The computer I used was a Intel I7-5930K with 16 GB of memory and 3 Western Digital 1 TB Black hard drives.

I ran a couple of quick tests against the GTX-980 and a Titan X video card. I used both a benchmark project and a real world project.  I also did a few tests with a 4K project.

The difference between the benchmark project and a real world project is, the benchmark project is made up of almost all GPU effects/transitions. This is designed to push the GPU for benchmarking purposes and it may not represent a typical timeline for most people.

The real world project, the timeline contains simple cuts and a lot fewer GPU effects/transitions. In this case the CPU is doing most of the work. This might be more of a realistic time line for some people.

Here are the results for rendering the timeline using the Benchmark Project:
GTX-980 took 20 seconds
Titan X took 14 seconds
GTX-1080 took 14 seconds

As you can see above, the GPU is doing most of the work due to timeline being made up of GPU effects/transitions.

Here are the results for rending the timeline using a real world project:
GTX-980 took 127 seconds
Titan X took 127 seconds
GTX-1080 took 127 seconds

With above, since the timeline wasn’t loaded with GPU effects/transitions, the CPU was doing most of the work.

Why are the results the same for all three video card with the real world project? It’s simple, there wasn’t enough GPU effects/transitions on this timeline to get any improvement between the three video cards. The GPU usage never went over 50% with any of these video cards.

Next I ran a text using a 4K project, here are the results:
GTX-980 took 62 seconds
Titan X took 55 seconds
GTX-1080 took 51 seconds

If you are editing with Adobe Premiere and you are already using a high end video card, then you may not need to upgrade to the GTX-1080 as the increase in performance isn’t that much.

Since not all timelines are going to be made up of the same GPU effects/transitions, the results you get are going to vary. For example, if you have a 15 minute timeline and it is all cuts only and you are not using any GPU effects, then the video card will not be used when rendering the timeline.

However, take that same timeline and instead of using all straight cuts, you use a dissolve, the GPU will come into play as the dissolve is a GPU transition.

NOTE: Currently there is bug in the nVidia drivers version 368.25, which is for the GTX-1080 and GTX-1070, where you can’t preview R3D media. All you get is a black video. Hopefully, nVidia will get this fixed soon.

NOTE: Your results will vary depending on your computer and how many GPU effects/transitions you have on your timeline.

Bottom line, I would say the GTX-1080 is 5% faster than the Titan X at a much lower cost than the Titan X. I was hoping for a better performance results like the gamers are seeing, but running it in Adobe Premiere it is just not there for me.

Is it worth installing a SSD into an older laptop?

That’s a good question. With the prices of SSD’s coming down, I decided to upgrade an older HP laptop I have.  The laptop is running a dual core AMD CPU at 2.2 GHz with 4 GB of ram and a 300 GB Hard Drive that has a SATA II interface.  I am also running Windows 10.

Since this is an older laptop, I didn’t expect too much with this upgrade as I figured the older dual core CPU and only have 4 GB of ram were going to keep things running slow.

I have always noticed the boot time to be very slow and it’s slow loading programs.  I seem to always be waiting on the hard drive to read or write the files I am working with.  So, I ran the ATTO Disk Benchmark and found my maximum write speed was around 66 MB/s and the read speed was around 78 MB/s.  Not that great.

So after looking at several SSD’s I purchased the Mushkin Enhanced Chronos 2.5” 240GB SSD.  While this SSD is a SATA III device, it is fully backwards compatible with SATA II and SATA I.

Mushkin Enhanced Chronos SSDThis Mushkin SSD has a maximum sequential Read that is rated at up to 555 MB/s and a maximum sequential write that is rated up to 535 MB/s when using an SATA III connection.

I made a backup of the hard drive using Macrium Reflect and a WinPE boot disk direct from Macrium Reflect.

Once that was completed, I installed the Mushkin SSD, which was very easy.  Next, I booted from the WinPE boot disk and restored all of the partitions on to the SSD.

Once that was done I rebooted the computer. It booted at least 60% faster. Nice.

Next, I opened up several programs and right away I noticed how much faster they loaded.  I was impressed, I didn’t expect it.

Then I ran the ATTO Disk Bench test. Here were my new results:

Maximum Write Speed 241 MB/s
Maximum Read Speed 274 MB/s

That’s over 3 times faster than when I was running with a hard disk.  Now remember, the laptop only has a SATA II interface, so these read and write speed are excellent for a SATA II interface.

I did the upgrade to this laptop back in September of 2015.  I have to say by just adding a SSD to this laptop, it has given it a new life.

Now some of you might be thinking, “Why not just buy a new laptop?” Well, for what I use the laptop for, which is editing web pages, email, surfing the web, editing photos, some light video editing with Sony Vegas Movie Studio and a few other things, just by adding the SSD to it, it is running so much faster, that for what I am doing with it, I just didn’t need a new laptop.

Sure, there are a few times when I am using Sony Vegas Movie Studio, that a more powerful CPU would make rendering faster, but most of the time, Movie Studio runs just fine for what I am doing with it.

The cost of the Mushkin Enchance Chronos 240 GB SSD was $79.00 at the time I purchased it.  This is a lot less than the cost of a new laptop.

If you have an older laptop or desktop and you notice the hard drive light is always on, you might want to try swapping out the hard drive with an SSD.  I think you will be pleasantly surprised at how you can breath some new life into an older computer.

Please Note: SSD prices are always changing, both up and down. Mostly down.

Choosing a Video Card for Sony Vegas and Sony Movie Studio – GPU Acceleration Explained

I have posted a new article to our website that covers what modern video cards work best for Sony Vegas Pro and Sony Movie Studio for GPU acceleration.  This article is for versions 11, 12 and 13 of Sony Vegas Pro and Sony Movie Studio.

I have seen on some of the computer forum people asking what type of video card should they get for Sony Vegas Pro or Sony Movie Studio.  Most of the time people are giving out advise based on the old information on the older video cards, expecting it to apply to the video cards we have today.

For example, when Sony first implemented GPU acceleration, the current line of video cards at that time were the NVIDIA GT/GTX500, GT/GTX400 and GT/GTX200.  Also, included are the AMD HD 4000, HD 5000 and HD 6000 video cards.

These cards are not around anymore, except on the used market and things are different with today’s modern video cards.

Did you know there are two areas where GPU acceleration comes in.  The first is timeline playback and the second is when you use the MainConcept AVC or Sony AVC encoder.

Sony Vegas Pro and Sony Movie Studio are based on using OpenCL.  Both AMD and NVIDIA offer OpenCL support with their video cards.  However, AMD has put a lot of effort into their implementation of OpenCL, which is why AMD video cards perform exceptionally well with Sony Vegas and Sony Movie Studio, along with other programs that use OpenCL.

Since NVIDIA is pushing their proprietary CUDA technology, they don’t put a whole lot of effort into OpenCL. It is not implemented well and it really shows when it comes to Sony Vegas and Sony Movie Studio.

Now some of you are going to say, that you can use CUDA with Sony Vegas Pro and Sony Movie Studio.  Yes, I know that.  But did you know it only works on the old NVIDIA GT/GTX500, GT/GTX400 and GT/GTX200 series of video cards?  And, it only works with the MainConcept AVC encoder.

It’s true.  CUDA does not work with today’s modern video cards from NVIDIA.  The reason why is MainConcept hard coded which video cards it would support and they are the NVIDIA GT/GTX500, GT/GTX400 and GT/GTX200 series of video cards.

While I am not saying you can’t use NVIDIA video cards, you can, but the performance will not be anywhere near what you get with an AMD video card.  A lot of people are unaware of this and they are telling people to use a NVIDIA card for CUDA support, when there is no more CUDA support for the newer NVIDIA graphics cards.

Take a few minutes and read this article: https://www.studio1productions.com/Articles/SonyVideoCards.htm

It has a ton of information in it and it will give you examples of some rendering tests I did with some NVIDIA and AMD video cards.